Can Cats Find Their Way Home From Miles Away

Can Cats Find Their Way Home From Miles Away. When a dog named hank navigated 11 miles home over two days to his foster owner in memphis, tn, recently, it had many of us thinking. While an adventurous indoor/outdoor cat is more likely to roam, a scared cat may not trust their inner compass, get confused, and get lost.

from venturebeat.com

At distances of 3.1 miles (5 km) from home, 60% of the cats chose the exit that faced the direction of their home, and at greater distances, they did not appear to know the direction of their home. Oftentimes, cats follow their curiosity. A couple from west palm beach, fla., lost their cat in daytona beach in november, only to have the animal show up two months later less than a mile from their house.

As the crow flies — or the cat walks — it was only a little more than two miles, but the vet is on a main road, and to get to our house, had to.

But that’s not the case for the wanderings of sundry other creatures, especially those that migrate. A couple from west palm beach, fla., lost their cat in daytona beach in november, only to have the animal show up two months later less than a mile from their house. Can a cat find its way home 20 miles away?

Of course cats will come home.

While an adventurous indoor/outdoor cat is more likely to roam, a scared cat may not trust their inner compass, get confused, and get lost. Crucially, this study also found that a cat’s homing ability increases at lower distances, and decreases as they are taken further from home. The response from many eminent animal researchers was the same:

Next best time to look is midnight to.

They found that the cats’ homing sense was only fair and directly related to their distance from home. Cat finds its way home 200 miles away after going missing on holiday So we know that cats can find their way home, but the question remains:

There have been accounts of cats finding their way home up to 200 miles.

For example, try putting their litter box outside. If you’re still doubtful, here are. Even more impressive was the 2013 tale of the geolocating cat that had been lost and found its way home after a journey of two months and 200 miles.

During the past decade, the national park service has removed more than 2,000 burmese pythons from florida.

At distances of 3.1 miles (5 km) from home, 60% of the cats chose the exit that faced the direction of their home, and at greater distances, they did not appear to know the direction of their home. So, if you’re wondering if your cat can find its way home despite the distance (think a hundred miles away), the answer is yes. Cats seem to have a sort of homing instinct which in some cases have guided cats to travel hundreds of miles back to their home.

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